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Comb honey with instructions

While the rest of the world is gaga over the Flow hive, die-hard comb honey fanatics like me still wonder why anyone would do that to honey. Like rum without Coke, macaroni without cheese, or fish without chips, honey without the comb is unthinkable. Some couples are just meant to be.

So whenever I give comb honey to someone who’s never eaten it, I babble incessantly, describing how to eat it and how to pair it. But the recipients can’t remember. Once home, they stare, perplexed, at the strange object in their kitchen. I can just imagine the conversation:

“She didn’t mean to eat the wax thingy?”
“No way! Just the honey, I think.”
“But how do I get it out?”
“Squeeze it, maybe?”
“I can’t understand why she didn’t take it out. That’s what beekeepers do, isn’t it?”

Well, you get the idea. Not good.

For many years I wanted to include a little set of instructions with my comb honey, but I couldn’t decide on a format. Postcard? Brochure? Flyer? It all seemed like too much paperwork for one small chunk of honey. After all, food that comes with footnotes, schematics, and part numbers can be off-putting.

Then one day Gretchen, a beekeeper in my area, told me about a label she designed to fit on the lid of a mason jar. I cottoned to the idea of a tiny label, so I asked her to send me the text. Turns out, I was really impressed with her wording, short and to the point, but when I asked if I could use it on my own label, she sheepishly admitted, “I stole it from you.” Oh dear. That lapse of memory worried me so much I put the project on hold.

A couple of years passed before I finally decided to start over. I consolidated the instructions onto a business card, front and back, and then had them printed on heavy, glossy cardstock with rounded corners.

They came out great. You can stick them on with tape, slide them into the container, punch a hole through and tie them to a jar with ribbon or raffia, or include them with your business card. The information is there without being the main event. So far, they are working out well.

Comb honey card front
Front of the comb honey card. © Rusty Burlew.
Comb honey card back
Back of the comb honey card. © Rusty Burlew.
AHW-with-honeycomb-ed
Then again, some folks don’t need instructions at all (I’m related to this one). Child © Anneke Davis.
Please note: The cards have been sold out and are no longer available.

Rusty
HoneyBeeSuite

Comments

Dick Barnes
Reply

Rusty….I’d like 100! I hope you get enough subscribers.

Dick Barnes
Long Beach (CA) Beekeepers Club

Rusty
Reply

Dick,

Great! You are first on my list.

Audrey
Reply

I’ll take 100, also.

Jim Harper
Reply

Put me down for 100, too, Rusty

Kathy
Reply

Love the idea, just not ready to use the cards yet!

Terry
Reply

I too would like to have 100.

Lindy
Reply

Rusty I would like to say I would have 100 too but I need them in Dutch so unless you are going multi lingual I will refrain but with the request for plagiarising the idea at some point in the future when it might be nice to have them in our lingo with a darker bee in the picture. That is if we ever have any surplus honey of course

Jeanne
Reply

I would love 100 of these. Most of my customers love honeycomb.
Thanks so much.

Maggie
Reply

I’d take 100. Vistaprint does a good job and has competitive prices.

vicki
Reply

While I get the honeycomb component, some of us aren’t prepared to haul honey supers from where our apiary is located to the house…much less the process involved to remove the honey. I love the idea that guests can visit and walk down with me, fill a jar, see the bees and have a mini-experience of how the basics of nature and our girls are hard at work. I am incredibly inexperienced and rather overwhelmed with farm chores, so the flow hive seemed like a good thing (especially as we get older and the chores get harder to do). Guess I’m not a die hard….

Miriam Valere
Reply

Rusty, I LOVE this! And the fact that I was planning on switching to comb honey this year instead of extracting is even better! I’d love to get some…put me down for 100 as well.

Marsha Bezold
Reply

I am interested, but what am I looking at cost wise for 100-150 do you think?

Robert l
Reply

100 for me as well, please.

Irene
Reply

I would love about 200 as well. Please!

Tom
Reply

I’d take 50, prefer 3 X 5 card or smaller.
Tom

VALKO
Reply

A HUNDRED FOR ME TO…

Cheryl Johnson
Reply

Rusty this is just what I’ve been looking for! I’m in for 200.:) Sweet!

Evelyn S
Reply

They are beautiful. I’ll take 100 also.

Bill scott
Reply

I am starting out with Ross rounds this year ( wish me luck )
Put me down for 100 too.

Phillip
Reply

I suppose it wouldn’t cost too much to send a 100 of them to Canada. I’d be down for at least 100, if the price is right.

David Caylor
Reply

100 for me please Rusty!

Fiona
Reply

I love the idea! If you were in South Africa, I would order too…

Donnabee
Reply

Try Vista Print. For 100. you can get over 2000! I’m in for 100. If you need help, let me know. Great idea. I am also appalled by that Flow hive.
A travesty IMHO.

Brenny Seader
Reply

100 for me!

Valerie
Reply

Absolutely Fabulous! I’ll take a 100,

Christa Pihl
Reply

What a great idea! My ignorant friends will become informed honey comb consumers. I definitely will take 100 of these beautiful labels. I am just sorry that I never thought of this myself.

Donivan Childers
Reply

put me on the list for 100

Nancy
Reply

Rusty, if you or readers would like versions in French, Spanish and Arabic, let me know. Sorry, can’t do Dutch.
Nan

Bill scott
Reply

Credit card does not go through?

Rusty
Reply

Bill,

I didn’t have any problems with credit cards; you are the only one who’s mentioned it.

Diane
Reply

Put me down for 100 also.
Thanks!

Audrey
Reply

My cards arrived this week and I am so pleased with them. Thanks for making them available to us.

becky
Reply

Rusty,
Thank you.

DB
Reply

Ordering supplies for next year. Cards are a great idea. Please let me know what the card says. TY, DB

Rusty
Reply

DB,

I used to have it posted, but I took it down for various reasons. I can e-mail you a copy.

Valerie
Reply

Can you email me a copy please? I lost my harvest and didn’t need them at that time. I’m coming back though, now. Thank you.

Rusty
Reply

DB and Valerie,

I re-posted the photos.

Janice
Reply

If you have time e-mail this I would love a copy! This is our first summer with cut comb and it’s so tasty! Thank you for your cutting tutorials as well-dental floss is fantastic.

Rusty
Reply

Janice,

I put the photos of the cards back into this post.

Janice
Reply

Thank you! That’s very helpful!

Anna
Reply

Rusty, are you still doing this? I’d order 50.

Rusty
Reply

Anna,

Sorry. After I sold out, I never reordered. They are very popular with purchasers, though. They seem to help sales because it gives people who have never had comb honey some ideas about what to do with it.

Steve
Reply

Rusty,

I’ve been able to get about twelve good comb honey squares this year and had an idea to generate a QR code and include a link to this page for people to access for a little guidance on how to enjoy honey in it’s purest form. I can insert the QR code onto my label. Do you mind if I reference your site? Thanks for all of your wisdom and advice.

Steve

Rusty
Reply

Steve,

Sure, give it a try. Sounds cool!

glenn c hile
Reply

Let me know if you do another order or if I can get the template and have them done myself. Thanks.

Rusty
Reply

Okay, Glenn. I asked the company that printed the cards if I could leave the template available for other people to order, but they don’t have a system for doing that. Since people like you keep asking, I may just go ahead and order another batch. Will let you know.

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