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Lucky on guard

Lucky belongs to James, a new beekeeper in Nisswa, Minnesota. Lucky reminds me so much of the kitty belonging to Vivian and Craig Scott of Delaware that I just had to post his photo—same passion, same intensity, same zeal for the job. How does one get one of these jobs, I wonder? What are the qualifications? I think I need a new line of work.

Lucky
Lucky hard at work. Photo by James.

Comments

Rusty
Reply

Glen,

Thanks, I think. Some strange photos . . .

Anna S.
Reply

I think it has to do with the bees. They must have a relaxing effect on Lucky 🙂 They surely do that to me!

Merilyn
Reply

No way my new active and seeming bitey bees would let my dog Amos lay down anywhere near the hive. I am not game to come within 7m of the hive.

Rusty
Reply

Merilyn,

My dog stays clear of the hives ever since getting stung as a puppy, but he chases and snaps at bees all day long. He often catches one, gets stung in the mouth (apparently), whines and rubs his nose on the ground for a minute or two, and then starts chasing and snapping again. I really don’t understand. Oh yes, did I mention he’s an Australian Cattle Dog?

Merilyn
Reply

Australian Cattle Dogs are programmed to work and are determined to do so whatever the difficulties or set backs eg getting stung in the mouth. Our Kelpie x dog catches flies that buzz around him. Some times those little black things are not flies and he appears to be stung too.

Merilyn
Reply

I am remiss, my European bees are stingey. Last weekend I saw some flowers for sale growing in pots outside a supermarket in Charters Towers, north Queensland. There were many native bees (little black bees that bite not sting) around the Nemesia flowers and a orange/purple daisy plants. I bought some of these plants and planted them in my garden. I noted that there were no European bees on those plants at the shop. Then I remembered that town, according to a lady I know who had allowed a friend to have a hive in her backyard, no longer allowed European bee hives in the town. She was told she no longer was allowed to have the hive and the owner had it removed.

James DeYoung
Reply

Thanks for posting, Rusty! I really enjoy your website-it has been very helpful. So far our bees haven’t stung anyone (including Lucky) but we’ll see how that goes!

Susan
Reply

I like the photo… but thought I would share my experience. I have 3 hives on the edge of my property line. My young golden retriever stepped on a honey bee in the grass in the yard on Sunday (at least 30 feet away from the hives). Had an anaphylactic reaction; seizure, vomiting, unconsciousness, hives and facial swelling. Emergency visit to the vet, injections of benadryl and steroids followed by daily oral benedryl and antibiotic for the week. This is my first experience with bee stings in a golden (I have had Goldens since the mid-80’s). Wasn’t aware dogs could have this reaction, but it is common. Epi-pens are not something veterinarians prescribe either, difficult to administer through the coat and to have the dosing correct. Just thought I would share.

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